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Lionfish

Marine Invaders Threaten Galapagos

Increasing tourism and the spread of marine invasive non-native species is threatening the unique undersea life around the Galapagos Islands.
Loggerhead Turtle, Caretta caretta

Loggerhead turtles home in on nests magnetically

Mother turtles find their way back to nesting beaches by looking for unique magnetic signatures along the coast, according to a new study published...
Cuttlefish and Camouflage

Cuttlefish – Master of Camouflage

What makes the Cuttlefish so good at controlling its colour and blending in with its surroundings? This month scientists at Harvard University and the...
Sea Urchin

Sunscreen nanoparticles harm sealife

Materials commonly used in sunscreens are harmful to marine life. Research shows sea urchin embryos, plankton and coral all affected.
Southern Elephant Seal (Mirounga leonina) by David Cook

Tagging Seals Improves Ocean Weather Forecasts

Elephant seals improve weather forecasts by up to 6%. Real time data from tagged animals being used by UK's Met Office.

Crabs feel and remember pain

New research published by a Queen's University academic has shown that crabs not only suffer pain but that they retain a memory of it.The...

Creature of the Month: Dragonet, Callionymus lyra

One hundred and eighty-six species of the "Little Dragon" fish live from Iceland in the North to the Indo-Pacific oceans in the South. ...

Preserving deep-sea natural heritage

Human activity in the deep sea is extending ever deeper, with recent research showing that this environment is more sensitive to human and natural...
Green Turtle

42,000 Turtles legally killed each year

Over 42,000 turtles are legally killed each year, 80% of them endangered green turtles (Chelonia mydas), a study suggests. British scientists investigated which countries allowed...
Lion's Mane Jellyfish by Tim Nicholson

Jellyfish stings: heat better than cold

Jellyfish stings are responsible for more deaths than shark attacks each year. Even “mild” stings can hurt for hours or sometimes days and leave lasting scars. According to some estimates, more than 150 million people are stung by jellyfish each year. New research shows that applying hot packs or immersing in hot water is much better for treating jellyfish stings than cold water which was previously widely recommended.