Category Archives: decompression sickness

Glucose pre-dive drink may prevent decompression sickness

Decompression sickness is caused by nitrogen being released from the blood too quickly, forming bubbles which may expand and injure tissue or block blood vessels. Anything that reduces bubble formation should decrease the risk of decompression sickness. Many factors increase the chance of decompression sickness, including dehydration. Researchers from the French Navy have found that […]

Laser spots decompression sickness

Decompression sickness, it not treated quickly, can cause lasting damage and may even be fatal. Instead of waiting for symptoms to appear, a University of Houston professor is developing a laser-based system that can diagnose decompression sickness in a matter of seconds. Kirill Larin, assistant professor of biomedical engineering and mechanical engineering, is using a […]

New Scale Developed to Diagnose Decompression Sickness

Researchers at the Hyperbaric Medicine Department, San Diego, have developed a three-point scale to diagnose decompression sickness. There are currently no universally accepted diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of decompression sickness. The new SANDHOG (SAN Diego Diving and Hyperbaric Organizations) criteria uses a point scale and entrance level for the diagnosis of decompression sickness. Once […]

Nitric Oxide Reduces Bubble Formation in Divers

Prevention of bubble formation is a central goal in standard decompression procedures. According to research published in the FASEB Journal, nitric oxide reduces bubble formation following decompression after dives of different duration and to different depths. In their experiments, the researchers from the University of Split and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology gave […]

To Exercise or Not to Excercise After a Dive?

Current thinking is that strenuous exercise after diving increases the risk of decompression sickness. Decompression sickness is caused by nitrogen being released from the blood too quickly, forming bubbles which may expand and injure tissue or block blood vessels. Anything that increases bubble formation will therefore increase the risk of decompression sickness. It has previously […]