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Jill Studholme

Jill Studholme
153 POSTS 7 COMMENTS
Edits SCUBA News (ISSN 1476-8011), the monthly newsletter with articles on diving and marine science. She tweets as @SCUBANews. A scuba diver with a biology degree, Jill has an special intererest in marine biology, coral reef conservation and the underwater environment.
Snapper

From Nursery Mangroves to Coral Reefs: Tracking Fish

It has long been thought that coral fish start life in a coastal nursery, such as mangrove or seagrass, before migrating to a coral reef. Fish use a variety of nursery habitats and may migrate very long distances from coastal wetlands across deep open water. This implies that it isn’t enough to protect adult habitat on coral reefs. Habitats that supply those reefs and the migration corridors that connect them also need protection.

Midnight Snapper is Creature of the Month

Bright yellow eyes distinguish the Midnight Snapper (Macolor macularis) from related species. You find it in the Western Pacific between 3 and 50 m,...
Leatherback Turtle

Changing Weather Threatens Survival of Baby Leatherback Turtles

Critically endangered leatherback turtles face serious threat from climate change in addition to existing egg poaching and fishing dangers. Scientists have discovered a clear link between climate and survival of the leatherback. Warming climate is killing eggs and hatchlings. Action is needed, both to mitigate this effect and, ultimately, to reverse it to avoid extinction. We need to change fishing practices that kill turtles at sea, intervene to cool the beach to save the developing eggs and find a way to stop global warming. Otherwise, the leatherback will be lost.

Maldives to Become World’s Largest Marine Reserve

All 1192 islands of Maldives to become World's largest marine reserve: the first country in the world to protect entire sea.

Australia Creates World’s Largest Marine Park

Australia today announced the creation of the world's largest marine reserve, covering the Great Barrier Reef and the Coral Sea. Oil and gas exploration...
Bullethead Parrotfish, Chlorurus sordidus

Coral reef fish ‘help protect jobs’

Jobs, ecotourism and diving industries can benefit from having a diverse supply of weed-eating fish on the world’s coral reefs, scientists say. Despite their small size, relative to the sharks and whales that often get more attention, herbivorous fish play a vital role in maintaining the health of coral reefs, which support the livelihoods of 500 million people worldwide, according to a study published this month in the journal Ecology.
Sharks in the Pacific

Scientists say 90% Shark Loss at Populated Pacific Islands

Pairs of SCUBA divers towed behind a small boat have been recording shark numbers at both heavily populated Pacific islands and islands away from...
Mauve Stinger Jellyfish, Pelagia noctiluca, by Andrew Reay-Robinson

Mauve Stinger is Creature of the Month

The Mauve Stinger, or Luminescent Jellyfish, is a beautiful jellyfish. Often coloured purple, you can find it around the world in warm and temperate...

Lawsuit Seeks Plan for Most Endangered Large Whale in World

The Center for Biological Diversity yesterday filed a formal notice of intent to sue the National Marine Fisheries Service for failing to develop a...
Award winning photo of dolphins

Deadline approaching for International Underwater Photography Competition

The Club of Sport Diving Tachov together with the Diving Union of the Czech Republic and City of Tachov are holding their 34th annual...