environment

Home environment Page 3
Coral Reef

Which sunscreens are safe for sea life?

It's a minefield trying to buy a sunscreen which doesn't harm the sea life. Even those trumpeting their green credentials are not always free from harmful chemicals and components. You have to read the label very carefully. So what are the nasties to look out for?

MSC Certifies Maldives Tuna Fishery Sustainable

Marine Stewardship Council awards the Maldives' pole-and-line skipjack tuna fishery its sustainability certification. This follows independent assessment against the MSC's environmental standard. The...

One Third of Reef-Building Corals Face Extinction

One third of reef-building corals around the world are threatened with extinction, according to the first-ever comprehensive global assessment to determine their conservation status....

Toxic boat paint pollution must stop

Member countries of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), including the UK, are perpetuating pollution from the Arctic to Antarctic that is contaminating wildlife and...

Scientists Call for More Antarctic Ocean-Observing

Oceanographers call for more Antarctic Ocean observations as Antarctica's climate is changing faster than anywhere else on the planet.
Orbicella faveolata coral by Verena Schoepf

Fat helps corals cope with global warming

Study reveals that corals which store fat are more able to survive bleaching events. When the water in which they live gets too warm, corals...

Healthy Coral Reefs Hit Hard by Warmer Temperatures

Coral disease outbreaks have struck the healthiest sections of Australia's Great Barrier Reef, where for the first time researchers have conclusively linked disease severity...
Leatherback Turtle

Changing Weather Threatens Survival of Baby Leatherback Turtles

Critically endangered leatherback turtles face serious threat from climate change in addition to existing egg poaching and fishing dangers. Scientists have discovered a clear link between climate and survival of the leatherback. Warming climate is killing eggs and hatchlings. Action is needed, both to mitigate this effect and, ultimately, to reverse it to avoid extinction. We need to change fishing practices that kill turtles at sea, intervene to cool the beach to save the developing eggs and find a way to stop global warming. Otherwise, the leatherback will be lost.
Mauve Stinger Jellyfish, Pelagia noctiluca, by Andrew Reay-Robinson

Killer Robots Slash Jellyfish

Korean researchers test jellyfish-killing robots. Jellyfish cause the fishing industry to lose money by breaking fishing nets. They sting swimmers. They block the seawater cooling systems of power plants. In 2009, a ten-ton Japanese trawler capsized after the three man crew tried to haul up a net loaded with jellyfish. But does chopping millions of jellyfish up solve the problems?
Elephant seals monitor ocean health

Elephant seals measure oxygen content of ocean

Diving almost continuously at great depth during most of the year, and covering large distance through remote areas of the Southern Ocean, Kerguelen elephant seals have proved to be a great alternative to other instruments for monitoring the oceans. The seal-derived measurements of oceanic dissolved oxygen give better results than other methods, according to new research.