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Sea Fan

How do Corals form new Species?

How do corals evolve into separate species when their larvae can drift around the ocean over extremely long distances?

Marine Robots detect Endangered Whales

Underwater robots detect nine endangered North Atlantic right whales

Wave-Powered Robot Completes 9000 Mile Journey

The first wave powered autonomous marine robot, called “Papa Mau”, has completed a 9,000 nautical mile (16,668 kilometers) scientific journey across the Pacific Ocean...

Mercury releases contaminate ocean fish

Scientists say mercury released into the air and then deposited into the oceans contaminates seafood that is eaten by people across the world. Over...

A Million Species in the Oceans?

The oceans may be home to nearly a million marine species but two thirds of them remain undescribed.

Corals call for fish aid when attacked by Seaweed

Corals in the genus Acropora generate much of the structural complexity upon which coral reefs depend, but they are susceptible to damage from toxic seaweeds. Acropora nasuta minimises this damage by chemically calling goby fishes who within minutes start chomping on the seaweed.
Frog Fish, Great Barrier Reef

Indonesia Coral Reefs Thrive under Centuries Old System

Indonesian coral reefs are thriving under a management system designed in the 17th Century.

Canada Invests $32 Million in Ocean Science

Canada has the longest coastline in the world. The Government of Canada is to provide $32.8 million in support of Ocean Networks Canada (ONC),...
Rich cold-water coral reef in the Whittard Canyon area by the Isis ROV

Scientists unveil first maps of deep sea corals

Proposed marine protected areas will cover just 30% of the UK’s deep sea coral reefs and 3% of the sponge fields, according to the first-ever set of maps detailing where vulnerable deep-sea habitats are likely to be found in the North East Atlantic.
Leatherback Turtle

Changing Weather Threatens Survival of Baby Leatherback Turtles

Critically endangered leatherback turtles face serious threat from climate change in addition to existing egg poaching and fishing dangers. Scientists have discovered a clear link between climate and survival of the leatherback. Warming climate is killing eggs and hatchlings. Action is needed, both to mitigate this effect and, ultimately, to reverse it to avoid extinction. We need to change fishing practices that kill turtles at sea, intervene to cool the beach to save the developing eggs and find a way to stop global warming. Otherwise, the leatherback will be lost.