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Nematostella

Venomous sea creatures change their venom recipe often

Venomous sea creatures often change their venom recipe, adapting the potency and recipe of their venom to suit changing predators and aquatic environments.
A new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge has shown that the dottyback, a small predatory reef fish, can change the colour of its body to imitate a variety of other reef fish species, allowing the dottyback to sneak up undetected and eat their young. Its Latin name, Pseudochromis, means false damselfish - giving clue to its mimicry abilities.

Dottyback reef fish is a “wolf in sheep’s clothing”

A new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge has shown that the dusky dottyback, a small predatory reef fish, can change the...
Rich cold-water coral reef in the Whittard Canyon area by the Isis ROV

Robots help map deep marine conservation zone

The UK's National Oceanography Centre has produced the first true three-dimensional picture of submarine canyon habitats, using a unique combination of marine robotics and...

Crabs feel and remember pain

New research published by a Queen's University academic has shown that crabs not only suffer pain but that they retain a memory of it.The...
Deep Sea fish

Deep sea fish remove a million tonnes of CO2 every year from UK and...

Fish living in deep waters on the continental slope around the UK play an important role carrying carbon from the surface to the seafloor. It...
Mussel with Byssus threads showing

Glue that stays sticky when wet is inspired by mussels

Using a protein produced by mussels, researchers have created a reversible synthetic glue that not only can bond securely underwater - but also may be turned on and off with electricity.
Bullethead Parrotfish, Chlorurus sordidus

Coral reef fish ‘help protect jobs’

Jobs, ecotourism and diving industries can benefit from having a diverse supply of weed-eating fish on the world’s coral reefs, scientists say. Despite their small size, relative to the sharks and whales that often get more attention, herbivorous fish play a vital role in maintaining the health of coral reefs, which support the livelihoods of 500 million people worldwide, according to a study published this month in the journal Ecology.

Turtles at risk from non-stick pans

The same chemicals that keep food from sticking to our frying pans and stains from setting in our carpets are damaging the livers and...
Coral Reef

What the oceans do for us: medicine from the sea

Humans are not infallible.  We get sick, we get injured.  Humans are a clever bunch though, and since prehistoric times we have used medicine...

Motorboat noise halves reef fish survival rate

Noise from passing motorboats increases stress levels in young coral reef fish and reduces their ability to flee from predators - causing more than twice as many to be killed.