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Southern Right Whale

Whale Watching from Space

But not by astronauts or space tourists. Scientists from the British Antarctic Survey are using satellite images to detect and count southern right whales...
Okeanos

Exploring the Ocean with the Okeanos Explorer

The ocean is vast and has been greatly explored in the last decades. But there is still much to be discovered. With clear plans...
Killer Whale

Several species of Killer Whale, scientist say

It has long been thought that there were several types of killer whales. Now scientists are recommending that at least three be reclassified as separate species.

Fleet of robots maps ocean fronts

The robots will help us to understand and monitor how key issues such as climate change, ocean acidification, unsustainable fishing, pollution, waste, loss of habitats and biodiversity, shipping, security and mining are affecting global ocean sustainability and stewardship.

Creature of the Month: Plumose Anemone

Plumose anemones (Metridium senile) occur in large numbers in good diving areas in temperate waters. They comprise a tall, smooth column topped with a...
Mauve Stinger Jellyfish, Pelagia noctiluca, by Andrew Reay-Robinson

Jellyfish blooms move food energy from fish to bacteria

Over the last few years reports of jellyfish blooms around the world have been increasing. This is bad news for the marine food web, as the jellyfish are voracious predators of plankton, but are not readily consumed by other predators. New study shows that jellyfish shunt food energy from fish toward bacteria.
Coral reef

Coral’s Algae store Nitrogen

Scientists have learned that coral's symbiotic algae can scoop up available nitrogen, store the excess in crystal form and slowly feed it to the...

Lotus Leaves inspire Net that could Clean Oil Spills

Scientists develop mesh that captures oil but lets water through and could help clean oil spills. The work was partly inspired by lotus leaves, whose bumpy surfaces naturally repel water but not oil.

Canada Invests $32 Million in Ocean Science

Canada has the longest coastline in the world. The Government of Canada is to provide $32.8 million in support of Ocean Networks Canada (ONC),...
Leatherback Turtle

Changing Weather Threatens Survival of Baby Leatherback Turtles

Critically endangered leatherback turtles face serious threat from climate change in addition to existing egg poaching and fishing dangers. Scientists have discovered a clear link between climate and survival of the leatherback. Warming climate is killing eggs and hatchlings. Action is needed, both to mitigate this effect and, ultimately, to reverse it to avoid extinction. We need to change fishing practices that kill turtles at sea, intervene to cool the beach to save the developing eggs and find a way to stop global warming. Otherwise, the leatherback will be lost.