coral

Home sealife coral

Coral Reefs are Disappearing faster than Rainforests

The rate and extent of coral loss are greater than expected, American researchers have found. And the reduction of coral rapidly causes a...
Coral reef

‘100 Years’ until Bleaching a Problem for Corals in Northern Red Sea

Warming seas around the world are threatening corals. But scientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Bar-Ilan University have noticed that corals in...

Review: On-Line Coral Reef Course

Beautiful OceansCoral Reef Ecosystem & Food Web Course$59.55http://www.beautifuloceans.com/This new course for divers discusses the coral reef ecosystem and food web. It illustrates its points...
Bleached coral on Great Barrier Reef, Australia by Brett Monroe Garner

Great Barrier Reef suffers extreme coral bleaching for the second year in a row

What we’re seeing is unprecedented - the reef is fighting for its life.
Fire Coral

Stinging Fire Coral

Fire corals are so called because of their powerful stinging hairs or nematocysts. These are used primarily for defence against fish like parrotfish...

Reef Search Finds Hundreds of New Species

Hundreds of new kinds of animal species surprised international researchers systematically exploring waters off two islands on the Great Barrier Reef and a reef...
Coral Reef

Equatorial coral reefs less affected by global warming

Ocean warming is threatening coral reefs globally. Whenever sea temperatures rise in an area, coral reefs degrade. However, a new study has found that...

NASA Helps Researchers Diagnose Coral Bleaching at Great Barrier Reef

An international team of scientists are working at a rapid pace to study environmental conditions behind the fast-acting and widespread coral bleaching currently plaguing...

Deep-sea corals live thousands of years

Deep-sea corals are found on hard substrates on seamounts and continental margins worldwide at depths of 300 to around 3000 m. Deep-sea coral communities...

Corals in trouble by middle of this century

Nearly one-third of CO2 emissions due to human activities enters the world's oceans, making them less alkaline and affecting calcification of corals. By the middle of the century, corals at the Northern edges of the tropics will be in trouble with the Hawaiian island reefs will be among the first to feel the impact.