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Mediterranean leaders urged to save tuna

Bluefin tuna populations have declined alarmingly over the past few decades due to overfishing fuelled by an increasingly expensive industry.A new WWF report shows...
Carpetflathead or Crocodilefish

Crocodilefish is Creature of the Month

Also known as the Carpetflathead, the Crocodilefish lives on sand and rubble near coral heads - although you might also find it in patches...
Potato Cod

Potato Cod is Creature of the Month

The mighty potato cod of Australia and the Pacific grows to 2 m long and can weigh 110 kg (242 lbs or over 17...

A million tonnes of North Sea fish discarded every year

A million tonnes of fish and other sea creatures caught in the North Sea are thrown overboard every year, according to a new report...

Midnight Snapper is Creature of the Month

Bright yellow eyes distinguish the Midnight Snapper (Macolor macularis) from related species. You find it in the Western Pacific between 3 and 50 m,...
Global Fishing Watch

Global Fishing Watch shows you ships fishing in protected areas

In the last 60 years the fishing industry have caught nine out of every ten large fish. That's only 10% of large fish like...

Loss of small fish may be starving the oceans

According to a report by Oceana, there is widespread malnutrition in fish, marine mammals and seabirds because of the global depletion of the small...
Snapper

From Nursery Mangroves to Coral Reefs: Tracking Fish

It has long been thought that coral fish start life in a coastal nursery, such as mangrove or seagrass, before migrating to a coral reef. Fish use a variety of nursery habitats and may migrate very long distances from coastal wetlands across deep open water. This implies that it isn’t enough to protect adult habitat on coral reefs. Habitats that supply those reefs and the migration corridors that connect them also need protection.
Pacific blue-fin tuna

How warm-bodied tuna hearts keep pumping in killer cold

When tunas dive down to cold depths their body temperature stays warm but their heart temperature can fall by 15 degrees within minutes. The heart is chilled because it receives blood directly from the gills which mirrors water temperature. This clearly imposes stress upon the heart but it keeps beating, despite the temperature change. In most other animals the heart would stop.

Third of Pelagic Sharks Threatened with Extinction

The first study to determine the global conservation status of 64 species of open ocean (pelagic) sharks and rays reveals that 32 percent are...