fish

Home sealife fish
A new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge has shown that the dottyback, a small predatory reef fish, can change the colour of its body to imitate a variety of other reef fish species, allowing the dottyback to sneak up undetected and eat their young. Its Latin name, Pseudochromis, means false damselfish - giving clue to its mimicry abilities.

Dottyback reef fish is a “wolf in sheep’s clothing”

A new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge has shown that the dusky dottyback, a small predatory reef fish, can change the...

Creature of the Month: Yellow Saddle Goatfish Work Together

Yellow saddle goatfish are a common site on the reefs of the Red Sea. A team of scientists from Switzerland though have discovered that...

Egypt Stops Reef Fish Exports

Egypt have cancelled a decree which allowed companies to collect reef fish and export them to Europe and other markets . According to the...
Sustainable fishing stamps

Stamping out over-fishing

For the first time, Britain's Royal Mail has issued stamps championing an environmental issue - and that issue is over-fishing.

Creature of the Month: Dragonet, Callionymus lyra

One hundred and eighty-six species of the "Little Dragon" fish live from Iceland in the North to the Indo-Pacific oceans in the South. ...
Pacific blue-fin tuna

How warm-bodied tuna hearts keep pumping in killer cold

When tunas dive down to cold depths their body temperature stays warm but their heart temperature can fall by 15 degrees within minutes. The heart is chilled because it receives blood directly from the gills which mirrors water temperature. This clearly imposes stress upon the heart but it keeps beating, despite the temperature change. In most other animals the heart would stop.

Is mislabelling good for fish?

With seafood, what you see is not always what you get. It’s no secret that mislabelling is rampant around the world. But new research says that whilst you may be being overcharged for imposter fish, mislabelling is actually good for global fish populations

Third of Pelagic Sharks Threatened with Extinction

The first study to determine the global conservation status of 64 species of open ocean (pelagic) sharks and rays reveals that 32 percent are...

Corals call for fish aid when attacked by Seaweed

Corals in the genus Acropora generate much of the structural complexity upon which coral reefs depend, but they are susceptible to damage from toxic seaweeds. Acropora nasuta minimises this damage by chemically calling goby fishes who within minutes start chomping on the seaweed.

Greenpeace confronts Mediterranean Tuna Fishermen

The Greenpeace flagship Rainbow Warrior has headed off to sea on a campaign to defend the Mediterranean and halt destructive bluefin tuna fishing operations....