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Whale shark

Creature of the Month: Whale Shark

The biggest fish in the sea feeds on microscopic plankton. A filter feeder, the Whale Shark's gills are specially modified to act like a...
Sustainable seafood

Who in the world wants sustainable seafood?

Survey of 9000 people finds that people around the world want to eat sustainably fished seafood.
Coral Reef

Malaysia creates its largest marine park

Malaysia has created the Tun Mustapha Marine Park - its largest yet. In the coral triangle, the new park will help protect almost 1...

Cyclone Larry Benefits Barrier Reef Corals

Cyclone Larry, which has hit Queensland, has done little physical damage to Australia's Great Barrier Reef, and may even do it some good. Ove...

Bikini corals recover from atomic blast

Half a century after the last earth-shattering atomic blast shook the Pacific atoll of Bikini, the corals are flourishing again. Some coral species, however,...

Diving the Marine World Heritage Sites

Forty-five World Heritage Sites - places of "outstanding cultural or natural value" - are located in marine areas. And many are also fabulous diving spots. The first marine Heritage Site to be listed was the Galapagos Islands, in 1978. Next listing was Australia's Great Barrier Reef. It contains the world's largest collection of coral reefs, with 400 types of coral, 1500 species of fish and 4000 types of mollusc. Australia has the most Marine World Heritage sites of any country: five. Ningaloo Coast was inscribed most recently in June 2011. Ningaloo, in Western Australia, is famous for its whale sharks. Also on the West coast is Shark Bay. This has three exceptional natural features: its vast sea-grass beds, which are the largest and richest in the world; its dugong (sea cow) population; and its stromatolites. Stromatolites are rock like structures built by microbes, similarly to how corals build reefs. Shark's Bay stromatolites are 2000 to 3000 years old, but stromatolites have been being built for 3.5 billion years. Shark Bay is also home to five species of endangered mammals.
Conger Eel

Conger Eel is the Creature of the Month

The massive Conger Eel grows to almost 3 m (10 ft) long, the females often being bigger than the males. At night they hunt fish and crustaceans like crabs and lobsters. In spite of this divers often see crustaceans sharing a hole with a conger. Congers breed only once in their lives, at between 5 and 15 years of age. They migrate to deep water to spawn – some sources say as deep as 4000 m.
A new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge has shown that the dottyback, a small predatory reef fish, can change the colour of its body to imitate a variety of other reef fish species, allowing the dottyback to sneak up undetected and eat their young. Its Latin name, Pseudochromis, means false damselfish - giving clue to its mimicry abilities.

Dottyback reef fish is a “wolf in sheep’s clothing”

A new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge has shown that the dusky dottyback, a small predatory reef fish, can change the...
Jewel Anenome

Jewels of the Sea grab animals with their 100 ball-tipped tentacles then paralyse them

A myriad of colour patches cover the rock when jewel anemones make it their home. These flower-like animals, up to 2.5 cm (1") across, catch...

Preserve the Manta Ray in Indonesia

A Flying Manta Project has been initiated by Ivan Choong who is "proud to be using my skills with underwater photography to contribute back...