sealife

Home sealife Page 2

EU launches shark protection plan

The European Commission has launched a Plan of Action for the Conservation and Management of Sharks. The aim is to rebuild shark stocks and...

Diving the Marine World Heritage Sites

Forty-five World Heritage Sites - places of "outstanding cultural or natural value" - are located in marine areas. And many are also fabulous diving spots. The first marine Heritage Site to be listed was the Galapagos Islands, in 1978. Next listing was Australia's Great Barrier Reef. It contains the world's largest collection of coral reefs, with 400 types of coral, 1500 species of fish and 4000 types of mollusc. Australia has the most Marine World Heritage sites of any country: five. Ningaloo Coast was inscribed most recently in June 2011. Ningaloo, in Western Australia, is famous for its whale sharks. Also on the West coast is Shark Bay. This has three exceptional natural features: its vast sea-grass beds, which are the largest and richest in the world; its dugong (sea cow) population; and its stromatolites. Stromatolites are rock like structures built by microbes, similarly to how corals build reefs. Shark's Bay stromatolites are 2000 to 3000 years old, but stromatolites have been being built for 3.5 billion years. Shark Bay is also home to five species of endangered mammals.
Conger Eel

Conger Eel is the Creature of the Month

The massive Conger Eel grows to almost 3 m (10 ft) long, the females often being bigger than the males. At night they hunt fish and crustaceans like crabs and lobsters. In spite of this divers often see crustaceans sharing a hole with a conger. Congers breed only once in their lives, at between 5 and 15 years of age. They migrate to deep water to spawn – some sources say as deep as 4000 m.
Pacific blue-fin tuna

How warm-bodied tuna hearts keep pumping in killer cold

When tunas dive down to cold depths their body temperature stays warm but their heart temperature can fall by 15 degrees within minutes. The heart is chilled because it receives blood directly from the gills which mirrors water temperature. This clearly imposes stress upon the heart but it keeps beating, despite the temperature change. In most other animals the heart would stop.
Coral

Which sunscreens are safe for sea life and which should you avoid?

It's a minefield trying to buy a sunscreen which doesn't harm the sea life. Even those trumpeting their green credentials are not always free from harmful chemicals and components. You have to read the label very carefully. So what are the nasties to look out for?
Oceanic whitetip shark at Elphinstone reef by Alexander Vasenin

Creature of the Month: Oceanic Whitetip Shark – Carcharhinus longimanus

Diving with Oceanic Whitetips The glorious oceanic whitetip sharks spend a lot of time in shallow water, tend to swim slowly and are...

Butterflyfish Decline with Coral

Australian scientists have found evidence that climate change may play havoc with fish populations.Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies...

Why leatherback turtles linger in South Pacific

Tagging and tracking leatherback sea turtles has produced new insights into the turtles' behavior in a part of the South Pacific Ocean long considered...

Blue-Ringed Octopus, one of the World’s most Venomous Animals, is Creature of the Month

The blue-ringed octopus - Hapalochlaena lunulata - is said to carry enough venom to kill 26 people. These small animals spend much of their...
micro-plastic

Lush Latest Company to Phase Out Harmful Plastic Granules

Many, if not most, cosmetic companies are posing an unnecessary threat to the oceans with the tiny plastic micro-granules they add to their products...