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Red Sea Coral can Survive Climate Change, but not Sewage and Excess Nutrients

Over the last 30 years, half of the world's coral reefs have suffered significant damage due to climate change and acidification. The last three...

Butterflyfish Decline with Coral

Australian scientists have found evidence that climate change may play havoc with fish populations.Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies...

Creature of the Month: Yellow Saddle Goatfish Work Together

Yellow saddle goatfish are a common site on the reefs of the Red Sea. A team of scientists from Switzerland though have discovered that...
Lion's mane jellyfish

Giant Lion’s Mane Jellyfish is Creature of the Month

With tentacles up to three metres long and covered with stinging cells, it's better not to get too close to the Lion's Mane jellyfish....
Clownfish in anemone

Male-to-female sex change happens first in the brain, in clownfish at least

All clownfish start off as male, but can switch to female when circumstances allow, for example, when the only female present dies or disappears....
Researchers use robomussels to monitor climate change

Robomussels monitor climate change

Tiny robots have been helping researchers study how climate change affects biodiversity. Developed by Northeastern University scientist Brian Helmuth, the "robomussels" have the shape,...

Butterflyfish ‘May Face Extinction’

The Chevroned Butterflyfish may be at risk of extinction, scientists have warned. The case of the Chevroned Butterflyfish is a stark example of how...
Bullethead Parrotfish, Chlorurus sordidus

Coral reef fish ‘help protect jobs’

Jobs, ecotourism and diving industries can benefit from having a diverse supply of weed-eating fish on the world’s coral reefs, scientists say. Despite their small size, relative to the sharks and whales that often get more attention, herbivorous fish play a vital role in maintaining the health of coral reefs, which support the livelihoods of 500 million people worldwide, according to a study published this month in the journal Ecology.
starfish, Pisaster ochraceus

Mysterious disease creates Zombie Starfish

Sick and dying starfish (sea stars) have appeared in a multitude of locations between Alaska and southern California. "It's like a zombie wasteland," says...
Pacific blue-fin tuna

How warm-bodied tuna hearts keep pumping in killer cold

When tunas dive down to cold depths their body temperature stays warm but their heart temperature can fall by 15 degrees within minutes. The heart is chilled because it receives blood directly from the gills which mirrors water temperature. This clearly imposes stress upon the heart but it keeps beating, despite the temperature change. In most other animals the heart would stop.