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Marine Robots detect Endangered Whales

Underwater robots detect nine endangered North Atlantic right whales

Soft Coral is Reef Building

Scientists have long believed soft corals, one of the many endangered elements of marine life, are only minor contributors to the structure of coral...
North Atlantic Right Whale, Mother and Calf

Right Whales Threatened by Planned Seismic Surveys Along US Coast

Rare right whales would be harmed by planned surveys using extremely intense explosions. Companies have applied to survey as much as 90,000 miles of trackline off America's East Coast, running back and forth over the same area during the first year alone.
Okeanos

Exploring the Ocean with the Okeanos Explorer

The ocean is vast and has been greatly explored in the last decades. But there is still much to be discovered. With clear plans...
Seal

Government must act on State of Nature Report

The UK's first State of Nature report, which has been launched by Sir David Attenborough, reveals that 60% of UK wildlife species are in...

ROV Finds New Coral Species

Researchers on the third-largest atoll in the world, the Saba Bank in the Netherlands Antilles, have discovered and collected two new species of soft...

Marine-i backs innovative research approach for coastal wildlife

Rock Pool Project app lets the public identify a wide range of marine species and record the specific locations in which they were found - building up a unique new database

World-first discovery of hybrid sharks off Australia’s east coast

Scientists have discovered that sharks on Australia's east coast display a mysterious tendency to interbreed, challenging several accepted scientific theories regarding shark behaviour. The...
Great white shark

Great White Sharks Live more than 70 Years

Great white sharks may be among the longest-lived fishes. New study finds the shark can live over three times longer than previously estimated, which may mean it is even more vulnerable than thought.

Corals in trouble by middle of this century

Nearly one-third of CO2 emissions due to human activities enters the world's oceans, making them less alkaline and affecting calcification of corals. By the middle of the century, corals at the Northern edges of the tropics will be in trouble with the Hawaiian island reefs will be among the first to feel the impact.