environment

Home environment Page 2
Yellowfin Tuna

Tuna Industry calls for cut in Yellowfin Catch

Tuna companies and supermarkets have joined WWF in calling for better regulation of tuna fishing within the Indian Ocean. In a letter signed by...

Motorboat noise halves reef fish survival rate

Noise from passing motorboats increases stress levels in young coral reef fish and reduces their ability to flee from predators - causing more than twice as many to be killed.
Southern Elephant Seal (Mirounga leonina) by David Cook

Tagging Seals Improves Ocean Weather Forecasts

Elephant seals improve weather forecasts by up to 6%. Real time data from tagged animals being used by UK's Met Office.
Orbicella faveolata coral by Verena Schoepf

Fat helps corals cope with global warming

Study reveals that corals which store fat are more able to survive bleaching events. When the water in which they live gets too warm, corals...

Which reef life communities are most vulnerable to global warming?

A 100 years from now, all the species in many marine communities will be lost and replaced by new species able to tolerate warmer...
Underwater glider with sensors

Data shared from 1,900 sensors in the Gulf of Mexico to be quality assured

Nineteen thousand sensors collect data in the Gulf of Mexico every day, feeding it back to researchers around the world. The information acquired is...
Spinner Dolphin by Tim Nicholson of SCUBA Travel

Scientists find parabens in dolphins – cosmetics to blame

Cosmetic preservatives found in dolphins, sea otters, polar bears and seven other types of marine mammal. Parabens and their byproducts can act like oestrogen in animals.
Crown of thorns starfish, COTS

Divers kill crown-of-thorns starfish with vinegar whilst scientists unleash starfish-killing robot

Divers are killing crown-of-thorns starfish by injecting them with vinegar. Meanwhile, scientists are testing using starfish-killing robots rather than divers.
Derelict vessels identified for removal in the Charleston Harbor watershed. The South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium’s received funding to remove derelict vessels to help improving both the safety of navigable waterways and the health of essential fish habitat. (Credit: With permission from the South Carolina Dept of Natural Resources, Peter Kingsley Smith).

NOAA funds marine debris clean-up

NOAA, the US's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has awarded nearly $1.4 million to groups across the United States to remove marine debris from...
Elephant seals monitor ocean health

Elephant seals measure oxygen content of ocean

Diving almost continuously at great depth during most of the year, and covering large distance through remote areas of the Southern Ocean, Kerguelen elephant seals have proved to be a great alternative to other instruments for monitoring the oceans. The seal-derived measurements of oceanic dissolved oxygen give better results than other methods, according to new research.