sealife

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Seahorse app

App Helps Seahorse Research

Marine conservationists have launched a smartphone app in the hope of discovering new information about some of the ocean’s most mysterious and threatened animals...
European Sea Anemones

State of Europe’s seas getting worse

Europe is woefully behind in its ambition of achieving a 'good environmental status' of our seas by 2020, according to a report published today...

Motorboat noise halves reef fish survival rate

Noise from passing motorboats increases stress levels in young coral reef fish and reduces their ability to flee from predators - causing more than twice as many to be killed.

No sunglasses required for fish supper

Fishermen are always looking for a tasty catch - but it is the fish that have a natural advantage when it comes to spotting...
Tompot Blenny

Creature of the Month is the Charming Tompot Blenny

A large mouth, eyes set high on the head and its tufted tentacles above each eye give the Tompot Blenny (Parablennius gattorugine) a comical appearance. A much smaller fringed tentacle is positioned on the nostril beneath each eye.

Diving the Marine World Heritage Sites

Forty-five World Heritage Sites - places of "outstanding cultural or natural value" - are located in marine areas. And many are also fabulous diving spots. The first marine Heritage Site to be listed was the Galapagos Islands, in 1978. Next listing was Australia's Great Barrier Reef. It contains the world's largest collection of coral reefs, with 400 types of coral, 1500 species of fish and 4000 types of mollusc. Australia has the most Marine World Heritage sites of any country: five. Ningaloo Coast was inscribed most recently in June 2011. Ningaloo, in Western Australia, is famous for its whale sharks. Also on the West coast is Shark Bay. This has three exceptional natural features: its vast sea-grass beds, which are the largest and richest in the world; its dugong (sea cow) population; and its stromatolites. Stromatolites are rock like structures built by microbes, similarly to how corals build reefs. Shark's Bay stromatolites are 2000 to 3000 years old, but stromatolites have been being built for 3.5 billion years. Shark Bay is also home to five species of endangered mammals.
Seagrass

Seagrass meadows crucial for world’s biggest fisheries

New research shows that a fifth of the world's biggest fisheries depend upon healthy seagrass meadows. The meadows are also crucial for small-scale...
Endangered Sawfish Strategy Launched

Plan to save sawfish – most endangered fish in the sea

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has released a global strategy to prevent extinction and promote recovery of sawfishes.The strategy by...
At 9 foot long, not including the tail, tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) Harry Lindo is not exactly on the small side. In just over 3 years Harry swam over 44,000 kilometres – that’s more than the circumference of the Earth (just over 40,000 kilometres). Harry’s track is the longest recorded for a tiger shark, and probably the longest ever published for any shark species.

The travelling life of the tiger shark

At 9 foot long, not including the tail, tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) Harry Lindo is not exactly on the small side.  It’s not Harry’s size...
California Sheephead

Sex-changing fish recover more quickly from over-fishing

People eat a lot of fish. Different sex-changing fish can follow several signals that prompt them to change sex. Some change from female to male at a fixed size or age. Often, fisheries will only harvest fish over a certain size. This means catching more males because they are usually bigger, which then skews the population towards female. Not enough males are then available to fertilise all the eggs produced by the females.