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Nematostella

Venomous sea creatures change their venom recipe often

Venomous sea creatures often change their venom recipe, adapting the potency and recipe of their venom to suit changing predators and aquatic environments.
shark

Scientists track sharks by sampling seawater

A simple bottle of seawater shows the identifiable tracks of numerous species of shark - no need for baiting, hooking, filming or tagging.
Sea Urchin

Sea urchins help scientists develop super-strong cement

A pillar made of this cement could be built 8000 metres high - and all because of the sea urchin blueprint.
Boaty McBoatface

Marine sensors funding to help probe mysteries of the deep

Researchers at the University of Southampton have received funding to develop sensors capable of working in extreme ocean conditions. The sensors that will result...
Dolphin by Tim Nicholson

Whales and dolphins have rich human-like cultures and societies

Whales and dolphins (Cetaceans) live in tightly-knit social groups, have complex relationships, talk to each other and even have regional dialects – much like...
Whale shark by Tim Nicholson

Shark Diving Tourists spend $25m in Australia

Shark diving tourism is a growing industry estimated to be worth more than $25.5 million annually in Australia. A new report has documented the value...
Several different vibrantly colored animals can bee seen in this image, taken at approximately 2240 meters (7350 ft), including an Anthomastus mushroom coral (center), precious pink coral (right), bamboo coral (left), and feather stars (Crinoids).

Weird and wonderful animals discovered in the deep sea

Okeanos Explorer completes latest expedition with fabulous photos and videos of extraordinary deep sea creatures.
White Shark, Carcharodon carcharias

Do White Sharks mistake Surfers for Seals?

Great white sharks know surfers aren't seals - most are just curious
Mussel with Byssus threads showing

Glue that stays sticky when wet is inspired by mussels

Using a protein produced by mussels, researchers have created a reversible synthetic glue that not only can bond securely underwater - but also may be turned on and off with electricity.
Researchers use robomussels to monitor climate change

Robomussels monitor climate change

Tiny robots have been helping researchers study how climate change affects biodiversity. Developed by Northeastern University scientist Brian Helmuth, the "robomussels" have the shape,...