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The Autonomous Surface Vehicle is being launched.

Robot technology to measure marine wildlife

Two robotic vehicles will work together over the next three weeks to investigate why the Celtic deep area of the Celtic sea is particularly attractive to marine predators like dolphins and whales.
plankton

Help Scientists Classify Plankton, from the comfort of your Computer

Researchers at the University of Miami want our help in classifying millions of underwater images of plankton. An online “citizen-science” project called “Plankton Portal” has...

CO2 emissions harm jumbo squid

The elevated carbon dioxide levels expected to be found in the world’s oceans by 2100 will likely lead to physiological impairments of jumbo (or...
Cuttlefish and Camouflage

Cuttlefish – Master of Camouflage

What makes the Cuttlefish so good at controlling its colour and blending in with its surroundings? This month scientists at Harvard University and the...
Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus

Basking shark mystery solved

Once thought of as a strictly cool-water species, basking sharks migrate to tropical waters each winter, according to research published in the June 2009...

Free online shark course from Cornell

Cornell University, in collaboration with The University of Queensland, has created a free online course on sharks to to spread the message that shark populations need help if we are to prevent further declines and possible extinctions

Barnacle Dinner in the Galapagos

The barnacle, a key thread in the marine food web, was thought to be missing along rocky coasts dominated by upwellings. Now a research...
Green Turtle

42,000 Turtles legally killed each year

Over 42,000 turtles are legally killed each year, 80% of them endangered green turtles (Chelonia mydas), a study suggests. British scientists investigated which countries allowed...
Sea Urchin

Sunscreen nanoparticles harm sealife

Materials commonly used in sunscreens are harmful to marine life. Research shows sea urchin embryos, plankton and coral all affected.
Nematostella

Venomous sea creatures change their venom recipe often

Venomous sea creatures often change their venom recipe, adapting the potency and recipe of their venom to suit changing predators and aquatic environments.