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Underwater glider with sensors

Data shared from 1,900 sensors in the Gulf of Mexico to be quality assured

Nineteen thousand sensors collect data in the Gulf of Mexico every day, feeding it back to researchers around the world. The information acquired is...

One Third of Reef-Building Corals Face Extinction

One third of reef-building corals around the world are threatened with extinction, according to the first-ever comprehensive global assessment to determine their conservation status....
blue whale

Migrating blue whales rely on memory to find prey

Meaning it could be difficult for whales to adapt if climate change causes food availability to deviate strongly from the whales' expectations.
Lion's Mane Jellyfish by Tim Nicholson

Jellyfish stings: heat better than cold

Jellyfish stings are responsible for more deaths than shark attacks each year. Even “mild” stings can hurt for hours or sometimes days and leave lasting scars. According to some estimates, more than 150 million people are stung by jellyfish each year. New research shows that applying hot packs or immersing in hot water is much better for treating jellyfish stings than cold water which was previously widely recommended.
SENSOR SNIFFS OUT METHANE IN DEEP-SEA VENTS AND COWS

Sensor sniffs out methane in deep-sea vents and cows

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that traps heat about 20 times more effectively than carbon dioxide. Understanding the sources of methane, and how...

Review: On-Line Coral Reef Course

Beautiful OceansCoral Reef Ecosystem & Food Web Course$59.55http://www.beautifuloceans.com/This new course for divers discusses the coral reef ecosystem and food web. It illustrates its points...
Green Turtle

Crime-scene technique used to track turtles

Scientists have used satellite tracking and a crime-scene technique to discover an important feeding ground for green turtles in the Mediterranean. University of Exeter researchers...
Spinner Dolphin by Tim Nicholson of SCUBA Travel

Scientists find parabens in dolphins – cosmetics to blame

Cosmetic preservatives found in dolphins, sea otters, polar bears and seven other types of marine mammal. Parabens and their byproducts can act like oestrogen in animals.
Photo by Enric Sala/National Geographic A group of hammerhead sharks swims over the sandy seafloor populated with garden eels at Darwin Island. These sharks are known for their ability to make sudden and sharp turns as the unique wide-set placement of their eyes allows them a vertical 360-degree view, which is ideal for stalking their prey.

Galapagos Islands Wolf and Darwin home to largest shark biomass in the world

More sharks live around the Galapagos Darwin and Wolf Islands than anywhere else on the planet
SCUBA Fish Count

Silent divers count more fish

SCUBA divers underestimate the amount of life in heavily-fished areas, a study suggests. Scientists from Australia compared fish counts by SCUBA divers—who produce noisy...