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Mercury releases contaminate ocean fish

Scientists say mercury released into the air and then deposited into the oceans contaminates seafood that is eaten by people across the world. Over...
Acropora Table Coral. Photo credit: Tim Nicholson.

Over 30% of Species Threatened with Extinction

IUCN today released the latest update of their Red List of Threatened Species, on the eve of the UN Conference on Sustainable Development in...
Anemone Hermit Crab, Dardanus species

Bodyguard: How the Anemone protects the Hermit Crab

Hermit crabs scuttle about the sea-floor using someone else's shell for a home. They always use empty shells and never kill the original occupant. When...
Coral Reef

Scientists Reveal New Technique to Monitor Coral Reef ‘Vital Signs’

With the world’s coral reefs threatened by coastal development, pollution, rising sea temperatures and other factors, scientists have developed a new method to monitor the health of these underwater ecosystems.
robotics, seahorse

Seahorse Armour Gives Insight Into Robotic Designs

The tail of a seahorse can be compressed to about half its size before permanent damage occurs, engineers at the University of California, San...

Marine Robots detect Endangered Whales

Underwater robots detect nine endangered North Atlantic right whales

Diving the Marine World Heritage Sites

Forty-five World Heritage Sites - places of "outstanding cultural or natural value" - are located in marine areas. And many are also fabulous diving spots. The first marine Heritage Site to be listed was the Galapagos Islands, in 1978. Next listing was Australia's Great Barrier Reef. It contains the world's largest collection of coral reefs, with 400 types of coral, 1500 species of fish and 4000 types of mollusc. Australia has the most Marine World Heritage sites of any country: five. Ningaloo Coast was inscribed most recently in June 2011. Ningaloo, in Western Australia, is famous for its whale sharks. Also on the West coast is Shark Bay. This has three exceptional natural features: its vast sea-grass beds, which are the largest and richest in the world; its dugong (sea cow) population; and its stromatolites. Stromatolites are rock like structures built by microbes, similarly to how corals build reefs. Shark's Bay stromatolites are 2000 to 3000 years old, but stromatolites have been being built for 3.5 billion years. Shark Bay is also home to five species of endangered mammals.

New initiative to reduce shark deaths

Today, the Shark-Marina, a not-for-profit company launches its strategy to prevent the deaths of millions of vulnerable and endangered species of shark. The...